Thursday, June 3, 2010

Question for my Lutheran Readers (if there are any)

As I understand the Lutheran concept of consubstantiation, it is because of the divine nature of Christ that His human substance is found in the Eucharist. The divine attribute of omnipresence is communicated to the human nature of Christ like the heat from a red hot iron would be transferred to something it was placed near. So, when one eats the bread and drinks the wine, they are actually chewing the body of Christ and drinking His blood.

But if Christ's human substance is now omnipresent, wouldn't that mean we also breathe Christ and type on Christ etc? Or is it just when the elements are consecrated that His substance is put in them?

2 comments:

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Andrew said...

My apologies for not finding this until almost two years after the fact. Allow me to try and respond anyway.
"As I understand the Lutheran concept of consubstantiation"

That's not our word. Consubstantiation is a word used by others to try and define our doctrine. We don't use it because we don't find it to be particularly helpful.

"it is because of the divine nature of Christ that His human substance is found in the Eucharist."

I'm not exactly sure what you mean by that. If you mean that his divine nature is what makes his real presence in the sacrament possible, then I have no problem with that statement.

"........But if Christ's human substance is now omnipresent, wouldn't that mean we also breathe Christ and type on Christ etc? Or is it just when the elements are consecrated that His substance is put in them?"

The only answer I can give to that is this: Scripture doesn't tell us that we tale Christ in by breathing or that we touch him when we type on our keyboards.

My answers aren't exhaustive but maybe they are helpful to a small degree.